Our principles in action

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement's Fundamental Principles. These principles unite the Movement in 189 countries and are the basis of our decisions and actions.

#ourprinciplesinaction

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Humanity

A boy is handing over face cream distributed by the Red Cross to his mother. Red Cross volunteers continue to provide assistance to the thousands crossing the border to Serbia in Tabanovce. They distribute water, food, hygiene articles and provides medical attention. Through their compassionate work, volunteers also provide hope.

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia.

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Humanity

The Red Cross and Red Crescent help goes beyond medical assistance. In the aftermath of the two earthquakes which hit the country in spring, Nepal Red Cross volunteers helped children to receive the medical care they needed, but they also care about their smile. Following clinic hours, the grounds of the Red Cross health clinic in Singati remained open, allowing children a space to come together, something hard to do in this shattered community. Read the story: http://bit.ly/1iLIgX5

Singati, Nepal

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Impartiality

In Syria, the Syrian Arab Red Crescent (SARC) and the ICRC cross front lines to deliver aid impartially to all those affected by the conflict and engage in dialogue with all parties to the conflict. In cities like Aleppo, SARC volunteers impartially and devotedly help thousands of people every month - regardless of who they are - to cross the front lines between the eastern and western parts of the city.

Syria

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Impartiality

Italian Red Cross volunteers continue to assist those who arrive on the shores of southern Italy in search for a safer life. Assistance is provided on the base of need alone and without discrimination. Though the lines are long, volunteers make sure that those in most need receive assistance first.

Messina, Italy

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Neutrality

Staying neutral is the key to being accepted by all sides and being able to carry out humanitarian work, outside of political debate. In South Sudan, the ICRC team facilitates the evacuation of the wounded on both sides of the front line and provides them with emergency medical and surgical assistance. Since December 2013, more than 6,000 emergency surgeries have been performed across the country.

South Sudan

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Neutrality

Libyan Red Crescent volunteers deliver medical supply to all hospitals in the country, in all fighting areas. By being neutral and not taking sides in hostilities the Libyan Red Crescent has access to all areas of the country to bring help where needed.

Libya

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Independence

Over a million people were affected by floods in Myanmar in July 2015, forcing many to leave their homes and seek refuge. Together with Movement partners, the Myanmar Red Cross Society, which supports humanitarian services of its government while always maintaining its autonomy and independence, provided critical assistance to the affected population. Having conducted its own assessments of needs, the National Society distributed essential items such as rice, blankets, mats and lamps to those most in need. Independent humanitarian action is crucial to gaining acceptance and access to affected communities.

Myanmar

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Independence

Australian Red Cross is working with multi-agency teams and the Department for Health to support vulnerable people in the community, as part of its auxiliary role to government. The Red Cross is a trusted partner in the interests of the most vulnerable.

Australia

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Voluntary service

Suzana Georgievska, is the only doctor in her Red Cross team assisting migrants on the move passing through the country to their final destination. “We basically have 200 to300 interventions per day. For some of them it saves their lives. For the other ones, it just makes it easier for them to continue their trip”. About her experience she says: “I feel useful. Our help means a lot to them and it means a lot to us too, that we can help in this situation.”

Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

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Voluntary service

Grenada Red Cross Society volunteers are vital in their community. At the headquarters they organize regular distributions of hot soup for homeless and people in need.

St George's, Grenada

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Unity

Thousands of people have arrived on the shores of Greece so far this year. The Hellenic Red Cross is responding to the needs of vulnerable migrants arriving on the many islands near the Turkish coast as well as on the mainland. By working across the whole country, the Hellenic Red Cross ensures people receive assistance beyond the moment of arrival.

Greece

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Unity

At the peak of the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, Fatmata supervised the Red Cross safe and dignified burial teams, one of the most challenging elements of the Ebola response. When families saw a woman on the team, they felt a lot more comfortable in releasing the bodies of their female relatives for burial. Fatmata would then dress and prepare the bodies, providing respect and dignity to the deceased and her grieving family.

Sierra Leone

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Universality

On the way to the United States, Manuel was robbed, and lost all information on how to contact his family. Once at destination, thanks to the collaboration between the American Red Cross and the Honduran Red Cross, he was able to call his family and to let them know he was safe and well. He was also able to get in touch with his aunt who was living in US, so that he could go and live with her.

Mexico

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Universality

The Red Cross Society of China has been one of a number of National Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies that have come to Nepal to provide medical care in the wake of the 25 April 7.9 magnitude earthquake. Universality means we are a global network that works in solidarity to bring help fast, where needed.

Nepal

Our shared commitment to serve the most vulnerable people everywhere, now and in the future.